A Love Affair with Yoga

A yoga enthusiast, protagonist Gilda Greco loves to share her experiences and extol the many benefits of the practice.

Here’s her story:

During the first forty-nine years of my life, I was content to be the non-athlete in my circle. Well, one of the non-athletes. Several ladies did play golf and one adventurous soul went white water rafting for a week each summer. For the most part, we were content to participate in book clubs, see movies and theater, and attend gallery openings and other cultural events.

All that changed after I won $19 million in Lotto 649 and embarked on a series of travel adventures.

Continue reading on A Holland Reads blog.


Advertisements

On Stepping Out of Time

A non-athlete, it took me a while to find a preferred physical activity, but once I discovered yoga, I was hooked.

That was nine years ago.

Since then, I’ve gone off the “yoga wagon” several times—interestingly enough right before prolonged writer’s blocks—but have now settled into a practice that both challenges and centers me.

Continue reading on the Buried Under Books blog.


Happy Yoga Day!

Here are some tips for wannabe yogini on a budget…

yogaimageYoga is big business. According to a 2012 “Yoga in America” study conducted by Sports Marketing Surveys USA…

20.4 million Americans practice yoga (8.7 percent of the adult population), an increase of 29 percent from the 2008 figure of 15.8 million.

$10.3 billion was spent on yoga classes and products, up from $5.7 million in 2008.

Of the current non-practitioners, 44.4 percent are interested in trying yoga.

The study didn’t focus on the reasons why these non-practitioners have not tried yoga, but procrastination and finances are likely to be at the top of the list. When people tighten their budgets, health clubs and hobbies are the first to go. And if they haven’t tried a particular sport or activity, they may table it indefinitely.

Continue reading on The Dollar Stretcher.


A Yoga Oxymoron

oxymoronI collect oxymorons—or to be more technically correct, oxymora—and like to pepper my conversations with same difference, random order, and open secret. When I use less common oxymora such as planned spontaneity, controlled chaos, clean dirt, and pontificatory salvos, I enjoy watching the puzzled expressions on the faces of listeners who wonder whether they should laugh or not.

But I was taken aback by the yoga oxymoron that appeared in the pages of my cozy mystery, A Season for Killing Blondes.

Continue reading on the Heroines with Hearts Blog.