The World Is Waiting On You

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

Elaine Welteroth ends her inspiring memoir/manifesto, More Than Enough, with this passage:

When you find yourself existing in the space between dreams realized, parts of you will feel too big for where you are, while other parts of you will feel too small for where you are going.

Go anyway.

Do not wait.

Do not wonder if you can.

Do not ask for permission.

When you get lost, it’s okay to stop, to look up, to look within for the answers–they’re always there.

And when the world tells you to shrink, expand.

Remember:

You have done enough. You are enough. You were born enough.

The world is waiting on you.

Source: More Than Enough, Page 316.


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8 Things That Change Your Life in One Year

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

If you’re looking to make changes in your life, consider the following advice:



Three Feet From Gold

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

Whenever I’m feeling discouraged or frustrated with a project, I reread the following excerpt from Napoleon Hill’s classic book, Think and Grow Rich.

One of the most common causes of failure is the habit of quitting when one is overtaken by temporary defeat. Every person is guilty of this mistake at one time or another.

An uncle of R. U. Darby was caught by the gold fever in the gold-rush days, and went west to DIG AND GROW RICH. He had never heard that more gold has been mined from the brains of men than has ever been taken from the earth. He staked a claim and went to work with pick and shovel. The going was hard, but his lust for gold was definite.

After weeks of labor, he was rewarded by the discovery of the shining ore. He needed machinery to bring the ore to the surface. Quietly, he covered up the mine, retraced his footsteps to his home in Williamsburg, Maryland, told his relatives and a few neighbors of the “strike.” They got together money for the needed machinery, had it shipped. The uncle and Darby went back to work the mine.

The first car of ore was mined, and shipped to a smelter. The returns proved they had one of the richest mines in Colorado! A few more cars of that ore would clear the debts. Then would come the big killing in profits.

Down went the drills! Up went the hopes of Darby and Uncle! Then something happened! The vein of gold ore disappeared! They had come to the end of the rainbow, and the pot of gold was no longer there! They drilled on, desperately trying to pick up the vein again— all to no avail.

Finally, they decided to QUIT.

They sold the machinery to a “Junk” man for a few hundred dollars, and took the train back home. The “Junk” man called in a mining engineer to look at the mine and do a little calculating. The engineer advised that the project had failed, because the owners were not familiar with “fault lines.” His calculations showed that the vein would be found just three feet from where the Darbys had stopped drilling! That is exactly where it was found!

The “Junk” man took millions of dollars in ore from the mine, because he knew enough to seek expert counsel before giving up.

Most of the money which went into the machinery was procured through the efforts of R. U. Darby, who was then a very young man. The money came from his relatives and neighbors, because of their faith in him. He paid back every dollar of it, although he was years in doing so.

Long afterward, Mr. Darby recouped his loss many times over when he made the discovery that desire can be transmuted into gold. The discovery came after he went into the business of selling life insurance.

Remembering that he lost a huge fortune, because he stopped three feet from gold, Darby profited by the experience in his chosen work, by the simple method of saying to himself, “I stopped three feet from gold, but I will never stop because men say ‘no’ when I ask them to buy insurance.”

Darby is one of a small group of fewer than fifty men who sell more than a million dollars in life insurance annually. He owes his stickability to the lesson he learned from his quitability in the gold mining business.

Before success comes in any man’s life, he is sure to meet with much temporary defeat, and, perhaps, some failure. When defeat overtakes a man, the easiest and most logical thing to do is to quit. That is exactly what the majority of men do. More than five hundred of the most successful men this country has ever known told the author their greatest success came just one step beyond the point at which defeat had overtaken them. Failure is a trickster with a keen sense of irony and cunning. It takes great delight in tripping one when success is almost within reach.


Fredrik Backman Visits Kitchener

Yesterday, I attended “An Evening with Fredrik Backman” at the central branch of the Kitchener Public Library. The New York Times bestselling author of five novels, two novellas, and a book of essays has been published in 25 languages across 40 countries.

Author and Conestoga College professor Judah Oudshoorn joined Fredrik for an armchair conversation. Judah began by introducing the Stockholm native as a non-pretentious and genuine master storyteller.

An informative and entertaining session followed where Fredrik displayed self-deprecating humor in his responses to questions about two of his novels: Beartown and Us Against You.

In writing these novels, Fredrik wanted to explore the locker room culture. It took him a while to understand that he was part of that culture. He commented, “The worse people in my books come from me.”

Fredrik really feels for his characters. They live and run around in his head for a long time. His wife often calls him “reality impaired.”

Fredrik did not aspire to be a writer. He likes telling stories and realized early in life that writing is an excellent way to communicate. As a child. he struggled to speak until he discovered that if you can write, you can edit yourself until it’s comprehensible. After an argument with his articulate, lawyer-educated father, Fredrik would go to his room and write a stern letter to his father.

Fredrik was inspired by Astrid Lindgren, the author of Pippi Longstocking. An intelligent and accomplished writer, Ms. Lindgren, could have won a Nobel prize in Literature. Instead, she chose to write Children’s Literature using the simplest of words. She didn’t want to exclude anyone from reading her books. Fredrik shares that goal.

Fredrik Backman’s advice to aspiring writers…

Dig deep within your emotions and ask: What story do I want to tell? And how can I express those emotions?

You won’t stumble onto an original story. What is original: Your voice and the time in which you live.


Inspirational Quotes from Children’s Literature

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

Here are sixteen of my favorite quotations from children’s books.



Sleep, Creep, Leap

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

One of my favorite writing craft books is Writing with Quiet Hands by Paula Munier. Here is one of my favorite passages:

There’s an old adage in gardening: Sleep, creep. leap. This typically refers to the growth pattern of newly planted perennials, provided they are nourished with sun and water and nutrients: The first year the plant will “sleep,” the second year the plant will “creep,” and the third year the plant will “leap.”

As your writing practice deepens over time, you will grow as a writer–in much the same way as a well-nourished perennial. You’ll take your seat, and you’ll write. You may think you are getting nowhere, but as you keep at it, and your pages pile up, you are literally growing yourself as a writer.

At first, this development may be unnoticeable–that’s the sleep part. But before you know it, you’ll find your prose creeping along toward good and then leaping right into great. Growth rates vary for writers just as they vary for plants, but whether your “sleep, creep, leap” development takes three months, three years, or three decades will depend on what you learn as you explore the many places your practice may take you and how quickly you apply that knowledge to your work in progress.


20 Motivational Quotes That Will Inspire You to Succeed

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

Here are twenty quotations that inspire and motivate. At this point in time, the words of Maya Angelou, Tommy Lasorda, and Zig Ziglar resonate with me the most.