Don’t Quit by Edgar A. Guest

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

I can recall feeling goosebumps rise as I listened to my Grade 8 teacher read this poem to the class. Its message still resonates, especially during cold, blustery days in mid January.



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TCIO Party For Guelph #NaNoWriMo

nanowrimocrestYesterday evening, I joined ten other NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) participants at Fionn MacCool’s in south Guelph for our TCIO (Thank Chuck It’s Over) party.

A diverse group, we hail from Guelph, Milton, Kitchener, and Wellington County.

Thanks to our M.L. Cindy Carroll for organizing and motivating us throughout the month.


My final stats…54,652 words with an average of 1,822 words per day.



Writers Are Superheroes Because…

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

Earlier this year, I started following the BlondeWriteMore blog. I enjoy receiving a daily dose of inspiration from a blonde British writer and blogger named Lucy Mitchell. She has a delightful blogging voice that brings a smile and a thought-provoking pause to my day. I strongly recommend following her blog.

This past Sunday, she wrote about wanting to quit the NaNoWriMo journey, a common feeling among those of us participating in the month-long writing marathon. Here’s a short excerpt from that post:

You can read the rest of the post here.


At Fair November

On Friday, I reached the 30K milestone on my NaNoWriMo journey. To reward myself, I visited the 44th Annual Fair November Craft Show at the University of Guelph on Saturday.

Each year, over eighty artisans share the best of traditional and modern Canadian handmade crafts in their temporary home—two floors of the University Centre—over a four-day period in the middle of November. A special treat for Guelphites and all friends of Guelphites: There is no admission fee. And parking is free on the weekend. Find out more here.

Every craft imaginable can be found, among them jewelry, metalwork, pottery, beeswax candles, Alpaca knits, gnomes, pottery, kiln fired glass, leather, and gourmet food products. This year, I was delighted to discover Celtic Stonework, Souper Heroes, Moore Design BirdFeeders, and the Grey Matter Collection.





Kick-Off Party for Guelph #NaNoWriMo

Yesterday evening, I joined a lively group of Guelph, Kitchener, Milton, and Fergus WriMos for the Kick-Off Party at Fionn MacCool’s, an Irish pub at the south end of the city. We chatted about our book descriptions and previous NaNoWriMo journeys.

We write in several genres, among them mystery, thriller, fantasy, science fiction, horror, romance, women’s fiction, Young Adult, and memoir. Special thanks to Cindy Carroll, our M.L. (Municipal Liaison) for the Guelph/Wellington region. You can find out more about Guelph NaNoWriMo here.

ONWARD ♦ AVANTI ♦ EN AVANT ♦ WEITER ♦ ADELANTE


TCIO Party for Guelph #NaNoWriMo

nanowrimocrestOn Friday evening, I joined five other NaNoWriMo winners at Fionn MacCool’s in south Guelph for our TCIO (Thank Chuck It’s Over) party. Of the seventy-three members in the Guelph region, twenty of us completed 50K or more words during the month-long marathon.

Congrats to our top achiever–Hennessey “Henn” Wick wrote 124,155 words during NaNoWriMo 2017!

Thanks to our M.L. Cindy Carroll for organizing and motivating us throughout the month.


My final stats…54,873 words with an average of 1,829 words per day.



More #NaNoWriMo Success Stories

Last week, I shared four spectacular NaNoWriMo successes on the Sisterhood of Suspense blog. With only three days left in the challenge, I thought I would boost everyone’s morale with these additional success stories. I was inspired and motivated by the advice and takeaways from their NaNoWriMo journeys.




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Alan Averill wrote the first chapter of The Beautiful Land several months before NaNoWriMo and then put aside the manuscript. When he learned that his friends were planning to participate in NaNoWriMo, he decided to join them. He wrote 60 percent of the novel and finished the rest in January. He credits the experience with helping him create a fast-paced book: “One of the great things about NaNo is that you don’t have time to think about what you’re doing. You’re basically a Writer Shark, and if you don’t keep swimming forward at all times, you’re going to die.”

In 2008, Marissa Meyer (author of Cinder) heard about a contest in which the Seattle-based writer who clocked in the most words during November would win a walk-on role in an upcoming episode of Star Trek. A chronic overachiever, Marissa took on the challenge and ended up writing three novels: Cinder (70,000), Scarlet (50,000), and Cress (30,000). Unfortunately, she didn’t place first but finished three novels that she polished over a two-year period. While much of the original material was scrapped, Marissa has no regrets: “I may not produce anything of quality during NaNoWriMo, but I always come away with a great road map.” She had offers of representation from three agents, and when the series went to auction, Macmillan’s Feiwel & Friends placed the winning bid.

Carrie Ryan started writing The Forest of Hands and Teeth during NaNo 2006. During that month, Carrie wrote between 20,000 and 30,000 words and then kept on writing afterward, finishing the first draft in April 2007. Later in 2007, Carrie sold the rights. The first of a trilogy, the book became a New York Times best-seller, and the film rights have been optioned by Seven Star Pictures. Carrie’s advice: “If you want to sell a book, you have to write a book. And if NaNo is what it takes to motivate you, then jump in with both feet. If you fail, the key is not to give up—the key is to keep writing.”

Stephanie Stuve-Bodeen wrote the first draft of The Compound during NaNo 2005. It then took six months to edit and polish the manuscript. The book sold to Feiwel and Friends in July 2006 and then went through another fourteen months of editorial revisions before final publication in late 2007. A long journey, filled with ups and downs, but definitely worth the wait. Seven more Young Adult books followed. Stephanie’s take-away: “This book is a symbol of how never giving up helped me realize a dream.”

ONWARD ♦ AVANTI ♦ EN AVANT ♦ WEITER ♦ ADELANTE