How a Guy Just Would Not Quit

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

I’m inspired by the back stories of authors, artists, and entrepreneurs. Here’s a quick look at the origins of Pinterest.



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Movie Review: Breakthrough

From start to finish, I found myself on an emotional roller coaster. Goosebumps rose, and tears fell as this incredible story unfolded on the big screen.

It is not surprising that faith leader DeVon Franklin decided to produce the film version of Joyce Smith’s book after only a brief encounter with Joyce, John, and Pastor Jason. Intrigued by Joyce’s account that she went into that emergency room and prayed her son John back to life, DeVon knew the film needed to be made.

The Smith family was involved at all stages of production from script development to meet-and-greets with the cast and crew. During the initial screening, Joyce commented, “You got it right.”

Chrissie Metz delivers an Oscar-worthy performance as Joyce Smith, the proud mother of adopted son John (Marcel Ruiz). Metz captures the intensity of Joyce’s faith but still manages to make her vulnerable and likeable.

When the film opens, mother and son are dealing with pubescent angst. Overprotective Joyce likes to smother her son with hugs while John tests his freedom and questions his roots.

The narrative takes an abrupt turn when John falls through an icy Missouri lake and remains submerged for fifteen minutes. On the verge of giving up, an emergency responder (Mike Colter) hears a voice that compels him to keep sweeping the lake floor. Within minutes, John is found and rushed to the ER.

Despite their best efforts, the health-care team is unable to resuscitate John. At the 45-minute mark, Joyce arrives and delivers an anguished plea, begging God to spare her son. Suddenly, John develops a pulse.

Dr. Garrett, a world-renowned specialist, expertly played by Dennis Haysbert, steps in. Compassionate but realistic, Dr. Garrett tries to prepare Joyce and her husband Brian (Josh Lucas) for less-than-ideal scenarios.

Joyce cuts him off with the most poignant lines in the film: “Go and be the best for John. Nothing less. And you just let God do the rest.”

Throughout the film, Joyce remains steadfast in her trust of God while most of the other characters believe she is in denial. A meltdown occurs, and Joyce surrenders to God's will. The morning after, John awakens with all his faculties intact. Two months later, John returns to playing basketball.

Topher Grace delivers an excellent performance as Pastor Jason, the hip young minister with a trendy haircut and wardrobe. Critical of his appearance and radical ideas, Joyce does little to welcome Pastor Jason to her faith community. But that doesn’t stop the pastor from joining Joyce at John’s bedside. Slowly, a bond slowly develops between mother and pastor. In a moving scene at the end of the film, Pastor Jason recognizes everyone who worked on John’s rescue and recovery and all who offered prayers on his behalf.

A must-see film that could reinforce or challenge your beliefs.


Listen to the Whisper

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

In her latest book, The Path Made Clear, Oprah Winfrey opens each chapter by sharing key lessons and personal stories. In Chapter 3, she shares the following spiritual principle.

Your life is always speaking to you. It speaks in whispers, guiding you to your next right step. And in many situations, the whisper is also the first warning. It’s a quiet nudge from deep within saying, Hmm, something feels off. A small voice that tells you, This is no longer your place of belonging. It’s the pit in your stomach, or the pause before you speak. It’s the shiver, the goosebumps that raise the hairs on the back of your neck.

Whatever form the whisper takes, it’s not a coincidence. Your life is trying to tell you something.

Heeding these signs can open the doors to your personal evolution, pushing you toward your life’s purpose. Ignoring them–sleepwalking through your life–is an invitation to chaos.

Life is about growth and change, and when you are no longer doing either, you’ve received your first whisper.

Pay attention to what makes you feel energized, connected, and stimulated. Follow your intuition, do what you love, and you will do more than succeed.

You will soar.

Source: The Path Made Clear, pp. 44-45


Inspired by Dr. Ross Pennie

This past Saturday, I attended the “Writing Your Life & Other Personal Stories” workshop facilitated by Brian Henry in Guelph. A book editor and professor, Brian teaches creative writing at Ryerson University in Toronto and has led workshops everywhere from Boston to Buffalo and from Sarnia to Saint John. You can find out more about Brian here.

In the morning session, Brian shared tips and techniques for writing creative non-fiction. In the afternoon, one of his star students—Dr. Ross Pennie—shared his fascinating writing journey.

A bit of history…

In 1977, at the age of twenty-five, Dr. Pennie set off for a two-year posting at a Catholic Mission on a remote island in the South Pacific. He spent his days dealing with tuberculosis, malaria and other infectious diseases. Evenings, he would read, write letters and update his diary.

At the end of his posting, he returned to Canada and spent the next twenty years working as an infectious-disease specialist and daydreaming about writing his memoirs.

Finally, he took action and signed up for creative writing courses and workshops. He also analyzed other memoirs, read books on writers’ craft, and joined a writing group. It took him two and a half years to complete The Unforgiving Tides, which was released in 2004.

The logline is a tantalizing one: A young doctor encounters mud, medicine, and magic on a remote South Pacific Island.

He then tried his hand at fiction and wrote the well-received Dr. Zol Szabo medical mysteries. The first of these, Tainted, came out in 2010 and won the Arts Hamilton Literary Award for Fiction. He followed up with three more medical mysteries: Tampered, Up in Smoke, and Beneath the Wake.

After 39 years of working as an intensive-care pediatrician and infectious-diseases specialist at McMaster and Brantford General Hospital, Ross retired.

But he is not retired from writing.

In a 2017 interview with Hamilton News, he shared his love of the creative process: “I love spending time with the characters. They seem very real … it’s almost as though they live with us. I also find writing meditative. I enjoy being on my own, so there is a meditative and reflective aspect to it.”

At Saturday’s workshop, Ross shared practical advice about the memoir process.

Here are ten nuggets that resonated with me:

• Dribble the dry facts gradually into your story so that any one page is not filled with a laundry list of details. Do not confuse the reader with too many characters and too much technical jargon.

• Keep the narrator humble, vulnerable, embarrassed, noble, quirky, smart, but never arrogant.

• Leave yourself open to memories that bubble up unexpectedly.

• Exaggerate your deficiencies. (You will probably be telling it like it is!)

• Imagine that your mother and Grade 8 teacher are never going to read your memoir. This leaves you free to add healthy naughtiness. Some examples of healthy naughtiness include embarrassing situations, swear words, family secrets, petty criminal acts, and sexual encounters.

• Break grammar rules with pizzaz. But first, learn the grammar rules.

• Show the action and dialogue up close. Don’t just talk about it from a distance.

• Punctuate your stories with newsworthy events. Make a dated list of earth-shattering events that occurred during the period of the memoir such as wars, elections, assassinations, and natural disasters. Include some of these events in the memoir.

• Write frankly without bitterness.

• And most important of all … Persistence Writes the Memoir.

Find more about Dr. Ross Pennie here.


14 Tips from Stephen King

On Wednesdays, I share posts, fables, songs, poems, quotations, TEDx Talks, cartoons, and books that have inspired and motivated me on my writing journey. I hope these posts will give writers, artists, and other creatives a mid-week boost.

Here are 14 tips, distilled from Stephen King’s book On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft, a must-read for all writers and wannabe writers.



Remembering a Phenomenal Woman

Born this day in 1928, Maya Angelou inspired generations of men and women throughout her extraordinary life. A Renaissance woman, she excelled in many roles, among them poet, author, playwright, actress, and civil rights activist.

Goosebumps rise whenever I read or listen to her poetry.

My favorite…Phenomenal Woman.