Tips for Coping with a Cancer Diagnosis

I am happy to feature this post from Anna Suarez and her colleagues, who are passionate about spreading hope to those who have cancer. I’m certain their tips will help newly diagnosed cancer patients and their loved ones.

Doctor talking to his female senior patient at the office

Doctor talking to his female senior patient at the office

Each year, 14 million people across the globe are diagnosed with cancer. Every person’s journey is different. Here is some advice on ways to cope with a cancer diagnosis.

Find survivors in your community.

cancersurvivor2When facing a cancer diagnosis it can be helpful to find a support group. Connecting with people who are experiencing the same things and can share in your struggles and triumphs can be immensely important for a patient’s mental and emotional health. These groups prevent patients from feeling isolated and the people they encounter may be able to offer helpful insights.

For people who have been diagnosed with rare cancers like mesothelioma this is especially important, but also a significant challenge. Cancers like mesothelioma, which is only diagnosed in 3,000 people annually, do not have the same widespread community. Online resources and even social media can be a great way to connect with other cancer patients and survivors. Additionally, when dealing with rare cancers it can be difficult to find information about your treatment options because fewer doctors specialize in that specific disease. This may also mean that you have to travel get to get access to the best treatments, or that those treatments might be more expensive. Following an online resource that specializes in your specific cancer or having a contact who can connect you to necessary resources can save you time and stress.

Write and read.

10615966_sWords have power: they bring us hope, connect us across generations and geography, and can be an outlet for our internal struggles. The written word can be a great resource for coping with your diagnosis and creative writing could be an ideal form of expression. Some studies even identify that writing for self expression can have physical benefits for cancer patients. One study found that expressing emotions through writing resulted in breast cancer patients reporting fewer symptoms and making fewer unscheduled doctor visits.

Reading offers another form of solace; the ability to escape from your surroundings for a short amount of time can not be overstated. Distraction therapies such as reading can be helpful in passing the time during treatment or while waiting for doctor appointments, but can also help mitigate some of patient’s symptoms such as anxiety, nausea, and pain. Reading also allows a patient to exercise their minds and exert a small level of autonomy over their lives, which some can feel is lacking after a cancer diagnosis.

Lean on loved ones.

sharinghandsAlthough it may sound cliche, friends and family truly are an essential support system. Many of us are not used to asking for help or admitting when we feel defeated. Reaching out to the people you’re close to can help relieve any feelings of solitude and supplement a cancer-focused support group. In addition to emotional support, loved ones also have the unique ability to make us laugh and distract us from hardship. Friends and family can also offer support by accompanying patients to their doctor visits and acting as another set of ears at the appointments.

Coming to terms with a cancer diagnosis is a process that is unique to every individual. Hopefully these suggestions can offer some additional support on your journey, or spark some of your own ideas on ways to fully cope with the diagnosis.


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